A Summary Sheet In Excel

Why?

A summary sheet can be used to quickly view key details from multiple sheets in a large workbook. A correctly formatted summary sheet can be used as the basis for a mail merge in Word.

How

This morning’s client help call came from a client using Excel to track employee performance reviews. Once the reviews are completed, they will use Word’s Mail Merge feature to generate individual checklists for each employee.

This process starts with a well-designed Excel workbook.

A view of the Summary Sheet
This summary sheet can be used for many purposes, including as the data file for a mail merge.

In the example above, there is a summary sheet which pulls the critical information from each individual employee’s sheet. Regardless of the scenario, a summary sheet is frequently used to present critical information at a glance.

Breaking out the individual sheets in the workbook
Each employee sheet has a similar layout.

Copying and pasting information or creating individually linked formulas is tedious. Instead; try creating a named formula.

=REPLACE(GET.WORKBOOK(1),1,FIND("]",GET.WORKBOOK(1)),"")

The GET.WORKBOOK function is a leftover from the old Excel 4 macro language. This is why the file needs to be saved as a macro enabled file. Even though there is no VBA in it. Finding documentation on GET.WORKBOOK is hard, since Microsoft doesn’t officially support it anymore. But a kind soul has posted here https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/mac/forum/macoffice2011-macexcel/getworkbook-help-in-macro-language-in-excel-2011/a359708d-b5b7-48ba-8d1e-c4114d4642d2

The GET.WORKBOOK functions cannot be entered directly in a cell, instead you must place them in a named formula. Here is what it looks like, using the Name Manager dialog box. The named formula can be called anything. Here I’ve used ListSheetsFunction as the name.

Adding a Named formula through the Name box
Using GET.WORKBOOK will mean your file will need to be saved as a Macro-Enabled workbook.

Once the named formula has been created, it can be used in conjunction with the INDEX function in the following formula:

=INDEX(ListSheetsFunction,ROW())
Demonstrating how the named formula captures the sheet name
After creating the formula in cell A2, copy it down column A for as many rows as there are sheets in the workbook.

You can see how the formula captures each sheet name as it is copied down the column. Note (this formula doesn’t always recalculate automatically, you may need to close/reopen your workbook or recopy the formula to force recalculation after editing sheet names).

Now that the list of sheet names is in the first column, you can use that to build the formulas that will give you the summary of each sheet in the workbook.

=INDIRECT(ADDRESS(2,COLUMN()-1,1,1,$A2),TRUE)
Adding the INDIRECT/ADDRESS formula to link to the key cells in the sheets
Depending on the layout of the detail sheets, you can copy one formula to the rest of the summary sheet.

In this case I copied the formula into cells B2:E4. Now as the fields are updated in each individual sheet, the summary will update. If new sheets are added, the formulas from the previous row can be copied down.


There are hundreds of formulas available in Excel; the trick is to cut through all the options and find the one that does the job you need done.

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